Projet Babel forum Babel
Contact - Règles du forum - Index du projet - Babéliens
INSCRIPTION - Connexion - Profil - Messages personnels
Clavier - Dictionnaires

Dictionnaire Babel

recherche sur le forum
Mots et expressions créés ou popularisés pendant la première guerre mondiale - Expressions, locutions, proverbes & citations - Forum Babel
Mots et expressions créés ou popularisés pendant la première guerre mondiale
Aller à la page 1, 2  Suivante
Créer un nouveau sujet Répondre au sujet Forum Babel Index -> Expressions, locutions, proverbes & citations
Voir le sujet précédent :: Voir le sujet suivant
Auteur Message
Pascal Tréguer



Inscrit le: 16 Dec 2012
Messages: 418
Lieu: Lancashire - Angleterre

Messageécrit le Wednesday 01 Oct 14, 19:25 Répondre en citant ce message   

Le mot barda existait avant, mais s’est répandu du fait de cette guerre. D’où le nom du personnage de Louis-Ferdinand Céline dans Voyage au bout de la nuit : Bardamu.

Le sens figuré du mot cafard s’est répandu pendant la guerre de 14-18 : il pouvait s’agir de la nostalgie qu’avaient les soldats de leur foyer, mais aussi - curieusement - de la nostalgie qu’ils avaient des tranchées lorsqu’ils étaient en « perm ».

Il y a aussi, évidemment, le verbe limoger.

On peut aussi citer le mot fritz (du prénom Friedrich), commun à l’anglais et au français (d’où frisé en français), pour désigner le soldat allemand. Les Britanniques ont aussi créé le mot Jerry, abréviation de German (et assimilé à l’abréviation de Jeremy), un terme humoristique mais aussi affectueux. (D’où, pendant la seconde guerre mondiale, jerrican). Le soldat américain était nommé Sammy, de (Uncle) Sam, sur le modèle de Tommy (abréviation de Thomas), le soldat britannique.

En anglais, l’expression over the top signifie à un degré excessif, exagéré. Cette expression vient de to go over the top (of the trench), aller par-dessus le parapet (de la tranchée), employée lorsque les fantassins recevaient l’ordre de monter à l’assaut des lignes ennemies.

Une autre expression anglaise née pendant cette guerre est to be pushing up (the) daisies (littéralement pousser les marguerites vers le haut), être mort et enterré, manger les pissenlits par la racine. L’image existait avant (cf. l’expression plus ancienne to turn up one’s toes, mourir, de to turn up one's toes to the daisies, tourner ses orteils vers les marguerites) mais l’expression elle-même est apparue pendant la première guerre mondiale.

Voici un article paru dans le magazine américain Everybody’s Magazine en janvier 1918 :
Citation:

Trench talk
Some Characteristic Slang Creations of the Soldiers

War is rich in new speech — so rich that in France, learned members of the French Academy have already begun to recognize, collect, and try to analyze some of the new language that has sprung spontaneously from the lips of poilus and Tommies in the past three years.

Some of this new speech is clear to us stay-at-homes. Of others we can appreciate the flavor only when their origin is explained. “Boche”, for instance, is an abbreviation of “caboche”, a hobnail, with a hard, rough, and square head. It was applied long ago, because of corresponding mental qualities, to the Germans as well as to all resembling them. Similarly, the Tommies call the big German guns “Berthas” in honor of the eldest daughter of Herr Krupp, the great German munitions maker.

Tommy's great word is “Blighty”. “Blighty” to him means England, home, and all that's worth living for. When he has a wound serious enough to send him home, he calls it a “blighty one”. The “Blighty” of the French soldier is Paris, which he affectionately and lovingly calls by a sort of pet name — “Panam”.

Tommy is perhaps likely to think most of “Blighty” when the “big stuff” comes over. The “big stuff” means the various kinds of large German shells. The high explosive ones are “crumps”; the big ones that give out a lot of black smoke, “Jack Johnsons” or “coal- boxes”. The poilus generally call the “big stuff” “marmites” or “stew-pots”. Any misfortunes that the “big stuff” may bring are spoken of lightly in the trenches. Being killed, and so requiring the services of “Holy Joe”, the chaplain, is referred to delicately as being “huffed” or as having “clicked it”, or “gone west”. Anyway, after it is all over and, if you are lucky, you are buried — “sewed in a blanket”, as it is called — and are thereafter alluded to as “pushing up the daisies”.

Life, however, is not all one “hickboo” — as the men in the air-service and elsewhere call a rumpus, bombardment, or attack. It may even be considered “cushy” — “pretty soft”, as we say — or comfortable, when you can “cadge”, borrow, a “fag”, that is, a cigarette, or “have a doss”, sleep, in your “funk-hole” or dugout. “Kip”, or sleep, is scarce, almost as scarce as “coles”, i. e., pennies, to blow in. But then, you always have your “rooty” or bread and your “gippo” or bacon-grease soup and your “machonochie”, or tin of scientifically balanced ration, the compounder of which is said to be marked for the last atrocity victim of the war. To top off the comforts, you occasionally get a letter from “Lonely Stab”, the girl who writes and sends parcels to Tommy. Companionship of any kind is more welcome than that of the “cooties”, despite the affection apparently conveyed in this name given to the trench vermin.

The air service, like most special branches, has its own vocabulary. An officer of flying status, but who for some reason does not fly, is called a “penguin”. This name is also applied to a type of trailing machine which does not rise from the ground. An officer in the flying service without flying status is called a “kiwi” after an Australian bird. A pilot is generally called a “quirk”. A flight is called a “flip”, and if it is a distinguished failure it is called a “wash-out”. An airplane is usually called a “bus”. The great hope of the airman is to “spikebozzle” or bring down a “Zepp”, or one of the smaller non-rigid dirigibles they call “blimps”. The air man's pest is the “onion” or large flaming anti-aircraft shell which “Archie” sends up as a sort of bouquet — with sometimes an unpleasant smell. “Archie”, is the general name for the anti-aircraft gun.

The constant association of Tommy and Frenchy has resulted in some linguistic Burbanks. Tommy finds “compray” much easier and shorter to say than “Do you understand?” and “Toots Sweet” is as effective as anything to the barmaid for “hurry up”, when Tommy gets a little leave to visit an estaminet for a cup of tea. His entertainment on short leaves is usually mild, and when, on his return, his fellow Tommies ask him what happened, he replies: “father of twins” — which is his equivalent for the emphatic negative, “pas de tout”.

The French soldier slang shows an even higher spirit of banter and playfulness. Poilu, that one word of national reverence, means simply brave, strong. The French soldier is also called “un bleu” from the light, gay, affectionate blue of his uniform. The enemy is referred to good-naturedly as “les Boches” or “les bobosses" or “the moles”, or simply “Fritz”. Out of “Boche” the poilus have made all sorts of expressions associated with the Germans or their qualities. “Bocherie” is German cruelty; “Bochonnerie”, is any kind of nastiness; “Bochisme” is the way the poilu alludes to German Kultur, and “bochiser” has become a common word to express spying of any kind.

Next to “Boche” the deepest term of reproach in French is to call another “un embusqué”, which means, literally, a soldier or civilian who has “ambushed” himself or taken some post free from hardship or danger. It is much more severe than our “slacker”. All who are down there fighting for France are “les copains” — literally, the sharers of bread.

The poilu calls his bayonet by various pet names: “Rosalie” (especially for the new-style bayonet which makes a wound like a cross), “a knitting-needle”, “a roasting-spit”, a “Josephine”, “a fork”; and the old-style bayonet “a cabbage cutter”, “a corkscrew”. A motor-cycle is a “teuf-teuf”. His machine gun is a “coffee-mill” or an “unsewing machine”. Small bombshells are called “sparrows”, and bullets are “prunes” or “chestnuts”. The poilu's knapsack is his “crystal closet”. The famous .75 field piece is called “the little Frenchman” or “Charlotte”. “Un cou-cou” is a small bombshell; and a large bombshell is called “un colis a domicile”, literally a C. O. D.

The American poilu is not going over unprovided with a lingo. He calls himself, by the way, a “doughboy” or “crusher”, which is fairly American- sounding. Cavalrymen he calls “bow legs”; a soldier who shares his shelter is his “bunkie”; the company barber is “butcher”; a soldier who works for an officer is a “dog robber”; the commanding officer is alluded to as “K. O.”; a junior officer is called a “goat”; the provost sergeant is a “hobo”; a teamster is a “mule skinner”; an old officer is called “old file”; the drum-major is the “regimental monkey”; the doctor is “saw-bones”; a new second lieutenant is a “shavetail”; field artillerymen are “wagon soldiers”; and a trumpeter or bandsman is a “windjammer”. And our doughboys are like Tommy and poilu in that they never “bellyache” or complain when the “slum”, i. e., the meat or vegetable stew, or the “sowbelly”, as the bacon is called, are bad. It's all in the game — the game of “Kan the Kaiser” — which is the only American equivalent thus far of any of the French war slogans like “Ils ne passeront pas”, or “On les aura”, “We'll get them”, “They shall not pass”.
Voir le profil du Babélien Envoyer un message personnel
José
Animateur


Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2006
Messages: 10765
Lieu: Lyon

Messageécrit le Thursday 02 Oct 14, 11:44 Répondre en citant ce message   

Lire les Fils suivants :
- Mots anglais d'origine militaire
- L'autre - étymologie des insultes

Lire également ces Fils concernant des mots cités plus haut :
- MDJ limoger
- MDJ jerrycan
- mourir (Dictionnaire Babel)
Voir le profil du Babélien Envoyer un message personnel
Larbalétrier



Inscrit le: 08 Mar 2009
Messages: 39
Lieu: L'Oeil de l'Oye

Messageécrit le Thursday 02 Oct 14, 22:39 Répondre en citant ce message   

Je note :
Citation:
“Bochisme” is the way the poilu alludes to German Kultur
L'orthographe "germanisante" du mot "culture" m'interpelle car nombre d'outils de propagande du début de la Grande Guerre (articles de presse, cartes géographiques ou cartes postales...), français ou anglo-saxons, désignent l'Allemagne sous l'appellation de Kultur Land (?)...
Voir le profil du Babélien Envoyer un message personnel
Pascal Tréguer



Inscrit le: 16 Dec 2012
Messages: 418
Lieu: Lancashire - Angleterre

Messageécrit le Friday 03 Oct 14, 17:04 Répondre en citant ce message   

Le mot Blighty désigne l’Angleterre ou la Grande Bretagne, en particulier dans l’argot des soldats. Pendant la première guerre mondiale, a Blighty ou a blighty one désignait une blessure non invalidante mais suffisamment grave pour permettre d’être rapatrié.

Du hindi bilāyatī, étranger, Européen, lui-même de l’arabe wilāyat, wilāya, dominion, district. Les troupes anglo-indiennes envoyées sur le front pendant la première guerre ont popularisé le mot.

Un autre terme popularisé pendant cette guerre : cushy (du hindi khush, agréable) signifie pépère, tranquille. Par exemple, to have a cushy time : se la couler douce. Et a cushy wound était aussi une blessure suffisamment grave pour permettre d’être rapatrié.
Voir le profil du Babélien Envoyer un message personnel
José
Animateur


Inscrit le: 16 Oct 2006
Messages: 10765
Lieu: Lyon

Messageécrit le Friday 03 Oct 14, 17:36 Répondre en citant ce message   

- en arabe, une Arabe wilāya correspond à une division administrative (en turc : Turc vilayet)

- j'ai rencontré à plusieurs reprises, récemment, le terme cushy, par exemple :
= The 24-year-old left his parents’ cushy home last year to fight for the Islamic State - [ NY Post - 26.09.2014 ]
j'avais pensé ouvrir un MDJ ... avec l'aide d'un spécialiste de l'hindi ...
Voir le profil du Babélien Envoyer un message personnel
Pascal Tréguer



Inscrit le: 16 Dec 2012
Messages: 418
Lieu: Lancashire - Angleterre

Messageécrit le Friday 03 Oct 14, 18:58 Répondre en citant ce message   

Royaume-Uni toot sweet (immédiatement) - humoristique, à partir de tout de suite.

Avant la première guerre, ce terme était utilisé pour représenter les français, mais pendant la guerre les soldats britanniques l’ont employé pour s’adresser à eux.

Extrait de Over the Top, by an American soldier who went (1917) par Arthur Guy Empey:
Citation:
"Toots Sweet." Tommy's Preach for "hurry up," "look smart." Generally used in a French estaminet when Tommy only has a couple of minutes in which to drink his beer.


D’où the tooter the sweeter (le plus tôt sera le mieux) - humoristique, sur le modèle de the sooner the better.
Voir le profil du Babélien Envoyer un message personnel
Pascal Tréguer



Inscrit le: 16 Dec 2012
Messages: 418
Lieu: Lancashire - Angleterre

Messageécrit le Friday 03 Oct 14, 19:16 Répondre en citant ce message   

« Prière » publiée dans Le Radical de Marseille en 1914 :

Citation:
Notre Joffre,
Qui êtes au feu,
Que votre nom soit glorifié, que votre victoire arrive,
Que votre volonté soit faite sur la terre comme dans le ciel ;
Donnez-leur aujourd’hui votre « pain » quotidien ;
Redonnez-nous l’offensive, comme vous l’avez donnée à ceux qui les ont enfoncés ;
Ne nous laissez pas succomber à la teutonisation, mais délivrez-nous des Boches !
Ainsi soit-il.
Voir le profil du Babélien Envoyer un message personnel
Jacques
Animateur


Inscrit le: 25 Oct 2005
Messages: 6511
Lieu: Etats-Unis et France

Messageécrit le Friday 03 Oct 14, 23:57 Répondre en citant ce message   

Pascal Tréguer a écrit:
Royaume-Uni toot sweet (immédiatement) - humoristique, à partir de tout de suite.

On pourrait traduire littéralement "toot sweet" par "confiserie qui fait tût".

angl. toot : son simple d'une trompette ou d'un sifflet, cf. fr. tût, tût tût
angl. to toot : faire tût
angl. sweet : confiserie; sweet est surtout britannique, alors que son synonyme candy est surtout américain

"Toot sweet" est une chanson du film Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968) au sujet d'un bonbon-sifflet

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PX_HljAELcA (vidéo de la chanson)
http://www.stlyrics.com/lyrics/chittychittybangbang/tootsweets.htm (paroles)
Voir le profil du Babélien Envoyer un message personnel
Pascal Tréguer



Inscrit le: 16 Dec 2012
Messages: 418
Lieu: Lancashire - Angleterre

Messageécrit le Saturday 11 Oct 14, 21:20 Répondre en citant ce message   

Royaume-Uni obsolète : Zeppelins in a cloud (Zeppelins dans un nuage) : sausages and mash, saucisses et purée (un plat britannique très populaire).
Expression apparue un peu avant la 1e guerre, mais popularisée du fait que les Zeppelins étaient utilisés pour des bombardements sur l'Angleterre.
Voir le profil du Babélien Envoyer un message personnel
Pascal Tréguer



Inscrit le: 16 Dec 2012
Messages: 418
Lieu: Lancashire - Angleterre

Messageécrit le Tuesday 21 Oct 14, 17:47 Répondre en citant ce message   

Royaume-Uni banger : saucisse

Je place ce mot dans ce fil car l’on dit un peu partout qu’il date de la première guerre, notamment parce qu’il figure dans Digger Dialects: A Collection of Slang Phrases used by the Australian Soldiers on Active Duty, publié en 1919.

Mais il s’agissait avant la guerre d’un mot d’argot utilisé dans la British Navy pour désigner des saucisses en boîte (tinned sausages). Il apparaît dans The Argonauts, un des « naval sketches » du recueil Naval Occasions and Some Traits of the Sailor-man (publié en septembre 1914), par Bartemius (nom de plume de L. A. de Costa Ricci) :
Citation:
Tinned sausages (“Bangers”) and bacon, jam, sardines and bananas, cocoa, beer, and sloe-gin: the Argonauts guzzled shamelessly.


Évidemment, septembre 1914 se situe pendant la guerre, mais celle-ci n’avait commencé que fin juillet. Et Bartemius le dit lui-même, The Argonauts avait été publié antérieurement dans The Pall Mall Gazette.

On dit aussi très souvent (parce que l’on présume que le mot date d’une période de guerre ou de pénurie) que les saucisses appelées bangers étaient de mauvaise qualité, contenaient toutes sortes d’ingrédients, dont de l’eau, si bien qu’à la cuisson elles explosaient, faisaient « bang ». (lire par exemple ici)

C’est très improbable car les bangers étaient particulièrement appréciées des marins, ainsi que le dit Mark Bennet dans Under the Periscope (1919) :
Citation:
“Just look at those sausages,” said Seagrave sitting down. “They look as if they’d spent their palmier days on a cab rank.”
“You’ve been spoilt,” replied the skipper. “You’ve been brought up on Service bangers, and now you think that our best Vienna sausages, provided by me at great personal expense, are beneath you.” (Tu as été élevé aux bangers règlementaires, et maintenant tu penses que nos meilleures saucisses de Vienne, fournies par mes soins à grands frais personnels, ne sont pas assez bonnes pour toi.)


Pourquoi banger ? Je crois que l’origine du mot est tout aussi difficile à expliquer que le fait que fromage était hymn-book dans l’argot de la Navy...
Voir le profil du Babélien Envoyer un message personnel
Pascal Tréguer



Inscrit le: 16 Dec 2012
Messages: 418
Lieu: Lancashire - Angleterre

Messageécrit le Tuesday 21 Oct 14, 18:46 Répondre en citant ce message   

Royaume-Uni cootie, pou de corps

De coot, foulque (oiseau aquatique ressemblant à la poule d’eau).

Cet oiseau avait la réputation d’être infesté de poux. Il existait d’ailleurs le proverbe as lousy as a coot (pouilleux comme une foulque). Le pou de la foulque a même son nom scientifique : Nirmus Fulicæ.

L’hypothèse selon laquelle cootie vient du malais kutu ne repose que sur une attestation isolée datant des années 1830.
Voir le profil du Babélien Envoyer un message personnel
embatérienne
Animateur


Inscrit le: 11 Mar 2011
Messages: 2778
Lieu: Paris

Messageécrit le Tuesday 21 Oct 14, 19:39 Répondre en citant ce message   

Pascal Tréguer a écrit:
On dit aussi très souvent (parce que l’on présume que le mot date d’une période de guerre ou de pénurie) que les saucisses appelées bangers étaient de mauvaise qualité, contenaient toutes sortes d’ingrédients, dont de l’eau, si bien qu’à la cuisson elles explosaient, faisaient « bang ». (lire par exemple ici)

Les saucisses françaises ont aussi tendance à exploser à la cuisson, bien que nous ne soyons pas en temps de guerre. Il me paraît donc assez approprié, ce nom de "banger".
Voir le profil du Babélien Envoyer un message personnel
Pascal Tréguer



Inscrit le: 16 Dec 2012
Messages: 418
Lieu: Lancashire - Angleterre

Messageécrit le Tuesday 21 Oct 14, 20:18 Répondre en citant ce message   

Je mettais simplement en doute la prétendue mauvaise qualité que mentionne le site auquel je renvoyais.
Voir le profil du Babélien Envoyer un message personnel
embatérienne
Animateur


Inscrit le: 11 Mar 2011
Messages: 2778
Lieu: Paris

Messageécrit le Tuesday 21 Oct 14, 20:45 Répondre en citant ce message   

Oui, c'est bien ce que j'avais compris.
Voir le profil du Babélien Envoyer un message personnel
Pascal Tréguer



Inscrit le: 16 Dec 2012
Messages: 418
Lieu: Lancashire - Angleterre

Messageécrit le Wednesday 22 Oct 14, 23:52 Répondre en citant ce message   

embatérienne a écrit:
Il me paraît donc assez approprié, ce nom de "banger".

Peut-être, mais ce qui m'étonne est qu'à l'époque où banger apparaît, on dit qu'il s'agit de « delicacy » (et nulle mention d'explosions). Et ce n'est que bien plus tard, afin d'expliquer le mot en fonction de bang au sens d'explosion, que l'on parle de la mauvaise qualité de ces saucisses, en la datant, au choix, de la première guerre, de l'entre-deux-guerres, de la seconde ou de l'immédiat après-guerre.
Voir le profil du Babélien Envoyer un message personnel
Montrer les messages depuis:   
Créer un nouveau sujet Répondre au sujet Forum Babel Index -> Expressions, locutions, proverbes & citations Aller à la page 1, 2  Suivante
Page 1 sur 2









phpBB (c) 2001-2008